How to Improve Eye Vision Naturally – Revolutionary Procedure to Correct Vision

It is possible to improve eye vision in a way that is natural. In this way, you will be able to return to a life without glasses or contacts, and give yourself excellent vision without needing to undergo expensive and dangerous surgery. This is accomplished through the use of eye exercises. These can be used in order to combat the effects of nearsightedness and other vision issues.

By finding a way to naturally improve vision, you will feel better about yourself and your independence. By reclaiming your 20/20 vision, you will also reduce your risk of experiencing eye diseases in the future.

Eye exercises work by getting to the root of the problem that is causing the vision issues in the first place. The eye muscles that cause the problem are trained in such a way that they become more relaxed, and more precise. In this way, the lens of the eye returns to its proper shape, which will naturally improve vision.

When you wear glasses, they may improve eye vision in the short term, but they actually put strain on your eyes. There have been several studies demonstrating that, over time, glasses actually cause your vision to become worse. This is why it is important to improve eye vision the right way. Not only do eyeglasses and contacts come to a common inconvenience, but they are also damaging to the eye.

Briefly testing these simple exercises are a lot healthier and successful. Studies conducted on monkeys showed that a monkey who wore nearsighted glasses became nearsighted within a short period of time. The reverse was true for farsighted glasses.

The first simple exercise is to find a period or comma on a page and focus on it, making it as clear as possible. Stare at the period until it comes into focus. Chances are after a few seconds the period will actually became less clear and blurry. Perform eye exercises on a regular basis. This gives your muscles the full control over your eyes that they are supposed to have. Try relaxing your eyes. Close them for a minute and let them relax. Now look at the period without straining. Don’t stare; instead, let your eyes slowly move around the page, over and around the period. Don’t focus only on the period, the eyes need movement. Make sure to blink a bit. Try closing your eyes and picturing the dot and then look at it again. Once the eyes are relaxed it should be easier to see the period. This also allows your eyes to relax so that they are not placed under strain.

The second exercise is the Word exercise. Find a word on the page that is five or more letters long. Stare at the word so that all the letters are in view, but don’t move the eyes. Focus entirely on the whole word trying to get the best image in your head. Again, staring and concentrating hard is going to cause the word to blur. These methods used to naturally improve vision are much safer than LASIK eye surgery as well.

These exercises can be used to fight problems associated with nearsightedness, farsightedness, blurred vision, and aging vision.

The former FDA chief, Morris Waxler, admitted that he thinks they made a mistake when they approved the surgery. It may improve eye vision, but there are several risks associated with it that aren’t worth it. The possibility that you will have vision problems after getting LASIK surgery is surprisingly high. One in every thirty-three people who undergo the surgery will experience vision problems afterward.

Eczema and What You Need to Know About It

The term Eczema is a medical term which is commonly used to describe a skin condition. In most cases, this skin condition is a type of dermatitis or an inflammation of the epidermis. The epidermis is the most outer layer of an individual’s skin. Eczema is normally a persistent skin condition that causes dryness of the skin or rashes of the skin. Some of the most common symptoms of this skin condition are; skin redness, swelling or inflammation of the skin, itching skin, skin dryness, crusting or flaking of the skin, skin blisters, cracking of the skin, or bleeding or oozing of the skin. It is common for individuals with Eczema to experience slight skin discolorations. Normally, skin discolorations are the result of breakouts that are attempting to heal themselves. Scarring is rare in mild breakouts, but it can occur. Most scarring is a result from severe cases. Eczema is commonly mistaken for psoriasis. However, unlike psoriasis, it is most likely to be found on the flexor point of joints.

The different types of Eczema

The term “Eczema” is used to describe a broad set of characteristics. However, there are many different types of Eczema. In most cases, Eczema is classified by the location of the breakout. For instance, in an individual has an Eczema breakout on their hand area, the type of Eczema is referred to as “hand Eczema.” Types of Eczema breakouts can also be classified by their physical appearance. For instance, if an individual has Eczema that displays multiple cracks in the area then the name of the Eczema would contain some sort of distinction that contains information about the cracks in the name.

There are numerous different types of Eczema breakouts.

The first type of Eczema is known as Atopic Eczema. Atopic Eczema is also called infantile, flexural, or atopic dermatitis. Atopic Eczema is an allergic disease believed to be caused by a hereditary trait. Atopic Eczema is common in individuals whose family suffers from hay fever and/or asthma. Most commonly, atopic Eczema is a rash that causes individuals a large amount of itching, especially on the head or scalp, neck, elbows, bend of the knees, and the buttocks region.

The second type of Eczema is known as contact dermatitis. Contact dermatitis has two main types: allergic and irritant. Allergic contact dermatitis normally results from a deferred reaction to an allergen. Irritant contact dermatitis results from a direct reaction from some sort of component such as a type of soap. Irritant contact dermatitis is responsible for about three quarters of all contact Eczema cases. Contact dermatitis is the most common skin disease today. The cure for contact Eczema is to simply avoid the object that the individual has contact with that sets off the Eczema. If the object that causes the Eczema is removed from the individuals contact, then the Eczema will normally disappear.

The third type of Eczema is known as Xerotic Eczema. Xerotic Eczema is also known as; asteatotic, craquele, or winters itch. Xerotic is a breakout where an individual has severe cases of dry skin. What happens in Xerotic Eczema is that the area of dry skin becomes so extreme and severe that the breakout turns in to Xerotic Eczema. This condition can become more severe during cold winter weather. In most cases of Xerotic Eczema, an individual’s arms, legs, and core area are the regions most affected by this type of Eczema.

The fourth type of Eczema is known as Seborrhoeic dermatitis or Seborrheic dermatitis. In infants, this type of Eczema is called cradle cap. This type of Eczema is commonly related to dandruff. Seborrhoeic Eczema causes an individual to have greasy scalp, flaking or peeling of the scalp, flaking or peeling of the eyebrows, flaking and peeling of the face, and flaking and peeling of the trunk in some individuals. This type of Eczema is harmless for the most part, unless this type of Eczema occurs on an infant and develops into severe cradle cap.

Those are the most common types of Eczema. There are other types of this condition, but these types are less common. These less common types of Eczema are; Dyshidrosis which occurs on palms, fingers, and toes. Discoid Eczema, which is round rashes on the leg region that may have oozing. Venous Eczema is a type of Eczema that occurs in individuals with poor circulation, varicose veins, or edema. Venous Eczema is most common in the ankle area. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a type of Eczema that causes severe itches on an individual’s limb, including the knee and thigh area, and the individuals back region. Neurodermatitis is a type of Eczema where a thick area of eczema is resultant of constant rubbing. Autoeczematization is a type of Eczema that results from an infection caused by a parasite, fungus, bacteria, or a virus.

Treatment for Eczema

As of today, there is still known cure for Eczema. However, there are numerous different types of treatments for Eczema which aim to maintain the breakout, reduce swelling or inflammation, and relieve itching or discomfort.

Eczema breakouts are frequently treated by using a corticosteroid medication. In most cases, the medication is in the form of an ointment, lotion, or cream. These types of medications do not cure Eczema breakouts but they are shown to cause an extreme improvement in the breakout. Corticosteroid medications work by reducing redness, relieving itching, and repressing other symptoms resultant of the Eczema.

There are various side effects to using corticosteroid medications to treat Eczema breakouts. If an individual uses the corticosteroid medications for an extended period of time, the chances of these side effects are likely to increase. Most commonly, an individual’s skin will become thin or irritated if an individual uses the corticosteroid medication too long. Doctors normally prescribe a low dose of steroids to the individual to decrease this effect. These medications can cause cataracts when used on the face if the medication is used near the eye area. You may develop a fungal or bacterial infection if you do not use antibiotics or antifungal prescriptions in conjunction with your corticosteroid medication.

Immunomodulators were created to treat Eczema after corticosteroid treatments. Immunomodulators were developed to suppress the immune system where the Eczema breakout is located. The United States Food and Drug Administration have posted a health advisory about using Immunomodulators because there is a possibility of developing cancer of the lymph nodes or skin cancer.

Antibiotics are also used to treat Eczema. Some cases of Eczema become severe and develop cracks in the skin. Cracks in the skin allow bacteria to easily enter the body of the individual. Individuals who scratch their Eczema when it itches also cause infection, which can spread throughout the body. Antibiotics are used to treat these types of conditions related to Eczema.

Immunosuppressant is a treatment for Eczema. Doctors use immunosuppressants when an individual with Eczema does not respond well to other forms or methods of treatments. Immunosuppressants are used to weaken the immune system, which sometimes cause dramatic improvements in the condition of the individuals Eczema. Individuals who undergo immunosuppressants are required to have frequent blood screenings and be checked by their doctor on a regular basis.

Anti-itch medications or ointments are commonly recommended by physicians when an individual has Eczema. This is because most types of Eczema cause the individual to become itchy. Scratching the Eczema can cause infection, so to avoid itching doctors prescribe anti-itch medications.

Doctors also urge individuals to maintain a daily moisturizing routine to avoid dry skin. This is because Eczema can worsen when the individual’s skin becomes dry. Keeping the skin moisturized is one of the most effective treatments an individual can perform themselves to provide relief and to help the area heal.

Doctors encourage individuals to avoid using harsh soaps, chemicals, and detergents. Individuals should replace these harsh items with moisturizing soaps, allergen controlled detergents, and chemicals that are less harsh on the skin. These harsh items can strip the natural oils off of the individual’s skin and cause the skin to become severely dry or irritated. Individuals should take regular baths in an oatmeal formula. Individuals who suffer from Eczema should also avoid using powders and perfume because these products also cause the skin to become dry.

Preventing Breakouts

There are various things an individual can do in order to prevent a flare in their Eczema. Some of the most common Eczema prevention methods are to avoid using harsh soaps, harsh detergents, harsh chemicals, and powders. Begin purchasing moisturizing soaps to keep your skin moisturized. Individuals should also purchase detergents that have allergen control agents. Avoid using powders and perfumes altogether if at all possible. Powders and perfumes are notorious for stripping natural oils from the skin which cause the skin to become dry. If you use harsh chemicals to clean, make sure you begin wearing rubber gloves so that you can avoid exposing your skin to the agents in the cleaner. Avoid extreme temperatures, dry air, and irritating clothing.

Hope for the Hopeless – Depression and Eating Disorders

Approximately 80% of all severe cases involving anorexia or bulimia have a coexisting major depression diagnosis. Depression is a very painful and all consuming disorder in and of itself. However, in combination with an eating disorder, depression is beyond devastating and is often masked within the eating disorder itself. Depression in eating disorder clients looks different than it does in clients who have mood disorder alone. One way to describe how depression looks in someone who is suffering with an eating disorder is: hidden misery. For eating disorder clients, depression takes on a heightened quality of hopelessness and self-hatred, and becomes an expression of their identity, not a list of unpleasant symptoms. The depression becomes intertwined with the manifestations of the eating disorder, and because of this interwoven quality, the depressive symptoms are often not clearly distinguishable from the eating disorder. One purpose of this article is to highlight some of the distinctions and differences in how depression manifests itself in someone suffering with anorexia or bulimia. Another purpose is to provide suggestions that will begin to foster hope for these hopeless clients within the therapy setting.

When dealing with eating disorder cases, it is important to understand that if major depression is present, it is most likely present at two levels. First, it will be evident in a history of chronic, low level, dysthymic depression, and secondly, there will be symptoms consistent with one or more prolonged episodes of acute major depressive disorder. The intensity and acuteness of the depression is not always immediately recognizable in how the client is manifesting their eating disorder. Clinical history taking will reveal chronic discouragement, feelings of inadequacy, low self-esteem, appetite disturbance, sleep disturbance, low energy, fatigue, concentration troubles, difficulty making decisions, and a general feeling of unhappiness and vague hopelessness. Since most eating disorder clients do not seek treatment for many years, it is not uncommon for this kind of chronic dysthymic depression to have been in their lives anywhere from two to eight years. Clinical history will also reveal that as the eating disorder escalated or became more severe in its intensity, there is a concurrent history of intense symptoms of major depression. Oftentimes, recurrent episodes of major depression are seen in those with longstanding eating disorders. In simple words, eating disorder clients have been discouraged for a long time, they have not felt good about themselves for a long time, they have felt hopeless for a long time, and they have felt acute periods of depression in which life became much worse and more difficult for them.

Unique Characteristics
One of the most unique characteristics of depression in someone who is suffering with an eating disorder is an intense and high level of self-hatred and self-contempt. This may be because those who have these major depressive episodes in conjunction with an eating disorder have a much more personally negative and identity-based meaning attached to the depressive symptoms. The depressive symptoms say something about who the person is at a core level as a human being. They are much more than simply descriptive of what the individual is experiencing or suffering from at that time in their life. For many women with eating disorders, the depression is broad evidence of their unacceptability and shame, and a daily proof of the deep level of “flawed-ness” that they believe about themselves. The intensity of the depression is magnified or amplified by this extreme perceptual twist of the cognitive distortion of personalization and all-or-nothing thinking. A second symptom of major depression shown to be different in those who suffer with severe eating disorders is that their sense of hopelessness and despair goes way beyond “depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day.” The sense of hopelessness is often an expression of how void and empty they feel about who they are, about their lives, and about their futures. Up until the eating disorder has been stabilized, all of that hopelessness has been converted into an addictive attempt to feel in control or to avoid pain through the obsessive acting out of the anorexia or bulimia.

Thirdly, this hopelessness can be played out in recurrent thoughts of death, pervasive suicidal ideation, and suicidal gesturing which many clients with severe anorexia and bulimia can have in a more entrenched and ever-present fashion than clients who have the mood disorder alone. The quality of this wanting to die or dying is tied to a much more personal sense of self-disdain and identity rejection (get rid of me) than just wanting to escape life difficulties. Fourth, the feelings of worthlessness or inadequacy are unique with eating disorders because it goes beyond these feelings. It is an identity issue accompanied by feelings of uselessness, futility, and nothingness that occur without the distraction and obsession of the eating disorder.

A fifth, distinct factor in the depression of those with eating disorders is that their excessive and inappropriate guilt is tied more to emotional caretaking issues and a sense of powerlessness or helplessness than what may typically be seen in those who are suffering with major depression. Their painful self-preoccupation is often in response to their inability to make things different or better in their relationships with significant others.

A sixth factor that masks depression in an eating disorder client is the all consuming nature of anorexia and bulimia. There is often a display of high energy associated with the obsessive ruminations, compulsivity, acting out, and the highs and lows in the cycle of an eating disorder. When the eating disorder is taken away and the individual is no longer in a place or position to act it out, then the depression comes flooding in, in painful and evident ways.

Compassion for the Hopelessness
The reality of working with people who are suffering in the throws of depression and an eating disorder is that it is difficult not to feel hopeless for their hopelessness. Their hopelessness is extremely painful. It is an inner torture and misery, and it is encompassed by intense feelings of self-hatred and self contempt. For many, their emotional salvation was going to be the eating disorder. It was going to be thinness, physical beauty, or social acceptability. Many come to feel that they have even failed at the eating disorder and have lost the identity they had in the eating disorder. Hence, the hopelessness goes beyond hopeless, because not only is there nothing good in their lives, there is nothing good in them. Not only is there no hope for the future, there is nothing hopeful at the moment but breathing in and out the despair they feel. It feels to them like the suffering will last forever. Therapists who work with eating disorders need to be prepared for the flood of depression that pours out once the eating disorder symptoms and patterns have been stabilized or limited to some degree.

It is my personal observation that clinicians need to change what they emphasize in treating depression in those engaging in recovery from eating disorders compared with those for whom depression is the primary and most significant disorder. Therapists need to find ways to foster hope for the hopeless, much more so for someone with an eating disorder because oftentimes these clients refuse comfort. They refuse solace. They refuse support. They refuse love. They refuse encouragement. They refuse to do the things that would be most helpful in lifting them out of the depression because of their intense inner self-hatred.

For the therapist, the pain that fills the room is tangible. Clients are often full of sorrow and anger for who they are, which takes the symptoms of depression to a deeper level of despair. In working with eating-disordered clients with this level of depression, it is important for the therapist to show a deep sense of respect, appreciation, and love for those who feel so badly about themselves and who are suffering so keenly in all aspects of their lives. In spite of all the suffering, these people are still able to reach out to others with love and kindness and function at high levels of academic and work performance. They are still able to be wonderful employers, employees, and students, but they are not able to find any joy in themselves, or in their lives. These clients tend to carry on in life with hidden misery, and a therapist’s compassion and respect for this level of determination and perseverance provides a context for hope. As therapists it is important that a sense of love and compassion grows and is evident in these times when the client feels nothing but hopeless and stuck.

Separating Depression from Self-hatred
One of the key components of working with the depression aspects of an eating disorder is to begin to separate the depression from the self-hatred. It is important to help the client understand the difference between shame and self-hatred. Shame is the false sense of self which leads someone to believe and feel that they are unacceptable, flawed, defective, and bad, an inner sense that something is wrong with their “being.” They feel unacceptable to the world and to themselves, and feel that somehow they are lacking whatever it is they need to “be enough.” Self-hatred is the acting out of that shame within and outside of the person. The self-hatred can be acted out in the negative mind of the eating disorder, that relentless circle of selfcriticism, self-contempt, and negativity that is a common factor in all who suffer with eating disorders. The shame can be acted out through self-punishment, self-abandonment, emotional denial, avoidance, minimization, self-harm, self-mutilation, and through impulsive and addictive behaviors both within and outside of the eating disorder. Self-hatred is the ongoing gathering of evidence within the client’s own mind that they are broken, and unacceptable. In time, the eating disorder becomes their main evidence that there is something wrong with them and that they are unacceptable. And so, in a sense, the eating disorder is their friend and their enemy. It is a source of comfort and it is the reason they will not be comforted, and until they can achieve perfection in the mind-set of an eating disorder, they have great cause to hate themselves for who they are and who they are not.

All of these examples of self-hatred become intertwined with the symptoms and the expression of the depression, and so it becomes important in therapy to help the client to separate what depression is and what self-hatred is for them. It has been my experience that focusing on the aspects of shame and self-hatred has been more helpful to those who have eating disorders than focusing only on the depression itself. The self-hatred amplifies the intensity and the quality of the depressive symptoms. By focusing on the self-hatred aspects we begin turning the volume down on how the depressive symptoms manifest themselves with the client.

I have found that emphasizing the separation of self-hatred from the depression and its symptoms, and then beginning to change and soften the expressions of self-hatred fosters hope and generates hopefulness. Clients begin to see and sense that maybe the problem is not entirely who they are. Some hope comes from knowing that the feelings and the sense of self they have may not be accurate and true. They may recognize that some of what they have done forever and what has felt very much a part of their identity is really a chosen and acted out pattern of self-hatred. Somewhere in this separation of self hatred and depression they begin to feel hope in themselves, hope in letting go of pain, and hope in having their life feel, look, and be different.

Another reason for the emphasis on self-hatred is to help clients begin to recognize and challenge the unique quality of the all-ornothing thinking that leads them to filter everything about their lives in this most negative, personal, and self-contemptuous way. Hope is generated by learning that everything does not say something bad about who they are, that normal life experiences are not evidence that there is something wrong with them, and that negative feelings do not prove as true, what they have always felt about themselves. The unique perfectionism inherent in this all-or-nothing thinking allows no room for anything but perfection in any area of thought, feeling, or behavior. To be able to let go of the self-hatred filter and begin to see many of these thoughts, feelings, and behaviors they experience every day as typical, usual, and acceptable begins to foster hope, more importantly the kind of hope that is not tied to the false hopes of the eating disorder itself. Part of what has made the eating disorder so powerful is that clients put all of their hope in the eating disorder itself. Eating disorders are hopeless because after clients have done everything in their power to live them perfectly, they have only brought misery, despair, dysfunction, and more hopelessness. The attempt to generate hope through anorexia and bulimia has failed. By focusing on the self-hatred, they begin to separate their eating disorder from themselves. They also begin to separate the eating disorder from their source of hope. They begin to recognize that hope is within themselves and hope is within reach if they will soften how they view themselves and if they will change how they treat themselves internally and externally. Separating the depression from the self-hatred can help clients see the eating disorder for what it really is, with all its lies and consequences, and can help them begin to see who they are in a more honest and accurate way.

Renaming the Depression
I have also found it helpful in working with this clientele to rename or re-frame the depression and its symptoms within some kind of specific pain they are experiencing. I emphasize the pain aspects because part of what makes the depression so painful for those with eating disorders is the internalization of hopelessness. We can remove the global, ambiguous, and future sense of the depression, and break it into smaller pieces, more specific, immediate, and emotionally connected to their experiences rather than to their identity. We talk a lot about their feelings of hurt and sadness, and explore and deepen their understanding about their sense of feeling unloved, or their sense of inadequacy, or their feelings of rejection and disapproval, etc. I try to underpin the depression in very specific and emotionally-connected understandings and expressions. Rarely do I talk to them about their depression explicitly while we are trying to understand, validate, and generate hope in specific areas of their pain. I have found it more helpful to spend sessions talking about how to generate hope for themselves over a sense of loss, a sense of powerlessness, a sense of disappointment, etc., rather than to keep talking about depression and what to do to help lessen it. The realization is that in the process of fostering hope by focusing on and discussing the different kinds of pain, we are also de-amplifying and de-escalating the depression. It is impossible to get to the bottom of depression and avoid the specific pain, since avoiding the pain is what clients have been trying to do through the eating disorder.

It is important to note here that there certainly can be, and usually is, biochemistry involved in the quality, intensity, and type of depression they are experiencing, and that careful evaluation and utilization of antidepressant medications is strongly encouraged as an active part of the treatment. It is also important to remember that clients with severe eating disorders often resist the notion of medication or sabotage use of the medication as an attempt to control their body and weight, and to foster a sense of control. It is important to be very attentive and regularly follow up on taking medication and continue to help them in the positive interpretation of the use of medication. Too often, medicine represents weakness and becomes evidence to again engage in self-hatred rather than being viewed as one more piece of the puzzle that will help generate hope in their recovery. It is my experience that clients often respond to and benefit from medication if we can reframe the medicine as a hopeful part of their healing and their recovery from both the depression and the eating disorder.

When dealing with eating disorders it is also important to continue to evaluate and recognize the impact of malnourishment on clients’ ability to process and/or modify the way they process information about themselves and about their lives. It is important to stabilize the eating disorder as a primary intervention and to emphasize renourishment before there will be a lot of success in treating the depression. Renourishing the brain and body is an important early framework for fostering hope.

Reducing Isolation
Another important component in treating depression among eating disorder clients is moving them out of isolation. It is often a very powerful intervention for clients to re-engage and reconnect with other people. Moving out of isolation and reconnecting with others in their lives generates hope. Pursuing a re-connection with others emphasizes opening themselves up to feel connected, to feel the love, compassion, and interest from others towards them and in expressing their own compassion and love toward family members, friends, other clients or patients, etc. Involving families in family therapy, partners in couple therapy, and friends in the treatment are often very powerful ways to lessen the depression and increase hope for clients because they feel comforted and supported by those who love them and care for them. Helping clients to communicate again with people in their lives brings hope and renewed ability to feel something different than self-hatred. To receive expressions of someone else’s love, concern, and genuine caring is hopeful and becomes a very important part of treatment for the depression.

Letting go of False Guilt
Another aspect of the treatment of depression relates to the intense and unrealistic levels of guilt. Again, the reason the guilt becomes unique for those with eating disorders is because of the self-hatred. The guilt tells them to feel bad and terrible about themselves because they are not perfect, or not in complete control, or not accomplished, or not accepted or liked by everyone, or because there are people in their lives who are unhappy. A pain that will not heal is the false guilt associated with untrue or inaccurate realities. It is helpful in working with eating disorder clients to help them clarify the difference between real guilt and false guilt. We can help them recognize that real guilt is associated with having literally done something wrong. Their recognition of that fact can lead them to correct it. False guilt tells them to feel bad and terrible about themselves, and whatever has happened becomes the evidence against them which supports the feeling of guiltiness. Oftentimes I try to help clients understand specific ways that false guilt enters the picture and feeds the self-hatred. It is frequently tied to areas of their lives where they feel or have felt powerless but have made themselves emotionally responsible. An example of this might be feeling bad about themselves because they feel responsible for a specific relationship outcome they do not really have the power to create on their own. They may feel badly about themselves because they cannot fix a situation or problem someone they love or care about is experiencing, or because they could not prevent a tragedy. False guilt is a sense of shame, feeling like they “should have known better” or had it “figured out” beforehand. False guilt is often an expression of what they are not, rather than who they are or what they are capable of doing. Sometimes the false guilt is just an active expression of the intense pattern of negative comparison between themselves and others that is so common with eating disorders. Eating disorder clients are constantly comparing themselves to someone else, both physically and behaviorally, and end up feeling a great deal of guilt about who they are because they do not match up in their comparison with someone else. Sometimes false guilt is an expression of self-hatred for some wrong done in the past, something they will not let go of or forgive themselves for. They continue to actively punish themselves for what happened or what they felt bad about doing, sometimes a very long time ago. They hold it against themselves mentally as support for their self-rejection.

Often the false guilt and feeling bad about themselves is tied directly to how important people in their lives are behaving or acting. They tend to somehow feel responsible or accountable for someone else’s negative choices or behaviors. False guilt gives them a sense of hopelessness because their ability to change it or re-frame it differently is impeded by their all-ornothing filter of self-contempt. They may compare themselves to unreasonable self-standards that no one could live up to, and therefore they become the exception to all the rules of normalcy. Somehow they have to live above acceptable, and the sense of guilt is evidence that they are not living at that expected, higher level of performance. Oftentimes when they hear feedback from other people about their behaviors, in particular their eating disorder, it becomes another encouragement to feel false guilt. The problem with self-guilt is that it produces intense feelings of fault, blame, guiltiness, shame, anxiety, and sadness, but instead of moving them to correction and change, it moves them to selfhatred, self-criticalness, self-doubting, and self-punishment. False guilt always leads to more hopelessness. Releasing false guilt fosters hope because it leads to an increased sense of freedom and choices through the setting of clear emotional boundaries.

In conclusion, it is important to emphasize that in order to truly intervene in the area of depression with those who have an eating disorder, we need to first stabilize and lessen the intensity and the acting out of the eating disorder. Until we do that, we are probably not going to truly see the depth and the extent of the depression and the very personal nature of how the depression manifests itself in eating disorder clients. It is also important to increase our awareness and understanding of how depression is uniquely different in those who suffer with eating disorders because it gives us therapeutic options and a framework to intervene in a more compassionate and hopeful way with those who have these coexisting disorders. The most helpful thing we can do in every session with these clients is to generate hope. Nurturing hope is not always a clear-cut and obvious list of techniques or interventions, but rather a willingness by both client and therapist to face the hopelessness in a kind and loving context. I hope that these therapeutic distinctions and suggestions will begin to foster some hopefulness for clients suffering with a coexisting depression and eating disorder. In facing the hopelessness, pain, selfhatred, guilt, and isolation, we can, little by little, foster and generate hope and decrease the depression. New hope will lead to answers. Genuine hope will lead to something better. Honest hope will lead to change.

The Differences Between Drug Addiction and Drug Abuse

A drug problem is an everyday struggle of not only the user, although some users haven’t realized yet that it is a problem, but the users family, friends, or special loved one. You may not instantly determine or realize that someone you care about is having problem with drugs.

People involved with drug problems or know someone who has at times thinks that drug addiction and drug abuse are basically the same thing, and should just be used interchangeably. But actually they are both different terms with different meanings. Complexity revolving drug abuse and definition has become increasingly clear and several efforts have been done to look of the right meaning both terms.

Drug Addiction:

The World Health Organization committee (WHO) had collected numerous of definitions concerning drug abuse and addiction and had suggested a generic term “drug dependence”. This addiction is defined as a disorder wherein the drug user’s behavior is being strongly influenced and dominated by the drug. It is a condition of recurring intoxication that happens when there is constant consumption of drug. It has characteristics of intense need or desire of continuous use, tendency of increasing dosage, unfavorable effects on both individual and society, and dependence on effects.

Drug Abuse:

Drug abuse is defined as the misuse of the drug or substance according the culturally acceptable standard. It is simply an abuse usage of substance which may involve excessive and habitual use in order to attain a certain effect. These so-called substances may be illegal, can be taken from streets and syndicates against the law, or can be legal as well in a form of prescription that are used in a pleasurable manner rather than medical.

Causes of Drug Addiction and Drug Abuse:

As both terms have different definition, their causes are different as well. Drug abuse is more complicated than drug addiction, although drug addiction has more forceful motivational condition. With drug addiction, it comprises the drug’s effect on the brain wherein it can become a strong motivational factor to use the drug again. On the other hand, drug abuse as a misuse of a substance, may or may not go together with a strong motivational factor to continue the use of the drug. In many cases, therefore, drug abuse does not necessarily make drug addiction, but drug addiction can constitute drug abuse.

Patterns of Behavior:

Drug addiction and Drug abuse have basically the same effects. Both have unwanted or unfavorable consequences both to society and the individual. Some symptoms and patterns of behavior of drug addiction and abuse comprise an abnormally slow in speech, reaction or movement, cycles of restlessness, inability of sleep or intensified energy, sudden gain or loss of weight, series of excessive sleep, sudden constant wearing of long-sleeved tops even under high temperature just to hide scars of injection points, loss of physical control, sudden impulse and confidence in doing risky activities, and withdrawal symptoms when trying to stop drug use.

Knowing the fact that drug users are prone to deny their drug-related symptoms and behavior, the family, friends, and loved ones must be sensitive and be more aware of these signs.

Being with a Drug Abuse or Addiction Problem:

At times it is not easily recognizable that someone so important to you is struggling with drug problem. It could be that it has started very early but not noticeable since the progression is slow, and that person might have been good in hiding the level of drug use from you. Or since that drug has been used early on and slowly, you might have easily adapted to the users behavior to the point that it seems normal still. It can be that the realization that someone so important to you is a victim of drugs is painful. You should never feel embarrassed. There are so many people who are in the same position as you. Drug abuse and addiction have affected millions of families all over the world.

There are available help and support everywhere. You can start by looking for support groups locally. Support groups can be in your very own religious area, private or government institutions, and small communities. By just listening to others who share the same experiences and dilemmas can be a very good way of support and give comfort. Other sources to find support and help would include a therapist, spiritual leader, a trusted friend or family member.

Behind The Ear Hearing Aids – What Makes Them The Most Obvious Choice?

For a person who is hearing impaired there are so many choices if they are going to get a hearing device. You can get aids that just go in the ear or ones that fit inside the ear canal completely. One would expect these types to be the most popular for cosmetic reasons. Today the most common of hearing aids to be used are behind the ear hearing aids.

These hearing aids are made up of an ear mould designed to fit in a person’s ear which is connected to a piece of tubing onto the hearing aid. The tube is known as the tone hook. The hearing aid will have a control for on and off, a control for volume and the battery compartment. The microphone is situated at the top of the hearing aid. Sound reaches the ear by the tubing, through the ear mould that is in the ear.

In general, children who are fitted with a device for their hearing loss are given behind the ear hearing aids. The reason behind this is that they tend to be much more robust than other kinds. They are easy enough for a child to learn to put an aid in and operate it, with the large controls that they can handle.

Children encounter a few difficulties with behind the ear hearing aids, which are usually minor. As they grow, so will the size of the ear canal and the shape, so they may require a refit twice a year. This can also happen with other styles of hearing aids. A child may have trouble remembering where their behind the ear hearing aid is as it is small when they have removed them, and other types could pose even more problems. With children, some do not have ears that are large enough for a behind the ear hearing aid. They need to be fitted correctly which sometimes helps, but if not a device known as a “Huggy” is available so the aid can be fitted to the head so that it is more secure.

As behind the ear hearing aids are a little larger than other devices which are usually worn in the ear, bigger batteries can be used. This gives more power and increased amplification. For any person that uses a hearing aid, this proves very useful if you have a mild hearing loss to someone who has a more profound hearing loss. If a person has problems with the use of their hands and fingers due to a condition like arthritis behind the ear hearing aids are easier for them to handle with the larger controls. They can have circuitry which is either analogue or the the advanced digital technological ones.